PTE Highlight Incorrect Words Practice Sample 1 – Sound During Sleep Fixes Learning

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For PTE – highlight incorrect words questions, you need to select the words in the text that differ from what the speaker says. Always stay synchronized with the audio while reading and click only those words which you are sure about.

PTE Highlight Incorrect Words: Sound During Sleep Fixes Learning

You will hear a recording. Below is a transcription of the recording. Find out the words in the transcription differ from what the speaker(s) said. Answer Key is provided for reference purpose.

 

Related Link(s): PTE Listening: Highlight Incorrect Words Practice Sample

Because a new study in the journal Science shows that a quick snooze after a mental workshop helps to consolidate learning. And that sounds heard during sleep can trigger associations that sharpen memory even more. A dozen subjects took a memory test in which they learned the positions of 50 objects on a computer screen. Each picture was paired with its own literature sound effects. So, an imagination of a shattering wine goblet was accompanied by the tinkle of breaking glass. Little sticks of dynamite? And so on.

Once the subjects had learned to put the pictures whether they belong, they were escorted to a dark room, fitted with conductor, and encouraged to take a little nap. While they slept, scientists played the sound cues for half the images presented during the memory test. And when the subjects woke up and retook the test, they were better at placing the 25 objects that sounded off during the doze. Even though none of them reported actually hearing anything.

TRANSCRIPT & ANSWER KEY

Because a new study in the journal Science shows that a quick snooze after a mental workshop —> workout helps to consolidate learning. And that sounds heard during sleep can trigger associations that sharpen memory even more. A dozen subjects took a memory test in which they learned the positions of 50 objects on a computer screen. Each picture was paired with its own literature —> little sound effects. So, an imagination —> image of a shattering wine goblet was accompanied by the tinkle of breaking glass. Little sticks of dynamite? And so on.

Once the subjects had learned to put the pictures whether —> where they belong, they were escorted to a dark room, fitted with conductor —> electrodes, and encouraged to take a little nap. While they slept, scientists played the sound cues for half the images presented during the memory test. And when the subjects woke up and retook the test, they were better at placing the 25 objects that sounded off during the doze —> siesta. Even though none of them reported actually hearing anything.

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